Moments of Life by Hospice

The newspaper story in this post was written by a hospice patient of ours after her Volunteer, Ellen, did a hand casting for her and her husband.  Our patient was so moved by it, she wrote a lovely article in one of our local newspapers.

Hand-Casting-Hospice-Patient-Hands Hand-Casting-Hospice-Patient-Hands 2

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A Last Wish to See the Star Wars Movie

As a Heart ‘n Home Social Worker, I have the opportunity to meet so many wonderful patients and families traveling their end-of-life journey. I love having the chance to provide emotional support and resources. My favorite part is hearing the experiences patients and families have had throughout their lives.

Recently, my husband, Mike, and I had the opportunity to volunteer for a 90-year-old patient who had a wish to see the new Star Wars movie. My husband has completed the Volunteer Training, but had not had a direct-patient volunteering experience. I was able to go as a Volunteer as well, since the patient was not one of mine. It also was my first assignment as a Heart ‘n Home Volunteer. Mike and I went to pick up the patient and quickly found that while his body had declined in abilities, his mind was clearly sharp and has years of amazing experience to share. He said he had not been able to go out often, so he felt like a car ride and movie was a real treat!

The patient was thrilled to see the new Star Wars film and was wide-eyed the entire movie. After the show, he shared how amazed he was at the technology used in the movie and we were able to spend time reminiscing. As we drove back to his home, I was thinking about the impact of this experience for him, as well as for Mike and me. This gentleman kept thanking us for taking the time to take him to the movies, and how kind this was. I thanked him for letting his care team know about his wish to see Star Wars, so that we had the chance to meet him.

This opportunity was so special because we were reminded how meaningful the act of sharing some time with another person can be. My husband was able to see the meaning behind volunteer work with hospice patients. I reflected on how my time may be as I age. Will others see me as a person who still has something to offer? This experience helped me see past the 90-year-old man to see him as so much more.  As a person who still has experiences and stories to share and contribute.

Idaho-Hospice-Social-WorkLiz S., LMSW
Fruitland Medical Social Services

 

 

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Dementia Only Stopped Her Words

Moments of Life by Hospice

Recently when visiting a couple of patients in a nursing facility, I was holding the hand of a little lady with severe dementia and talking to her softly and calmly.  She was unable to communicate with words because of her disease progression, but she spoke volumes of thanks to me when she pulled my hand up and kissed the back of it.  This non-verbal gesture spoke to my heart, encouraged my day, and reminded me just how a few extra moments to reach out to someone with love, especially those who can’t request it, can make a world of difference for both people.  Hospice made this moment possible.

Idaho-Hospice-NurseZac Friberg, RN
Nurse Coach

Sisters: The Last Visit

Moments of Life by Hospice

A Heart ‘n Home Volunteer scheduled to visit with and take one of our sweet, hospice patients to visit her sister, who lived just down the road. This patient had been able to drive herself up until the week prior. The sister was in a poor state of health, so making weekly visits was very important to our patient.  This went on for a couple of weeks, until the patient and Volunteer both noticed that the sister was really starting to decline. Unknown to the Volunteer and patient, one of their visits fell on the day the sister took her last breath. Because of the compassion of the Heart ‘n Home Volunteer, the patient was able to see, comfort, and be a sense of presence to her sister through her final hours.

Shortly after our patient’s sister passed away, we held a Celebration of Life in our Meridian office. The Volunteer brought our patient so she could grieve, honor, and celebrate her sister. The Volunteer sat with her through the whole thing and provided companionship in the sincerest of ways. Seeing the two of them in the room together – the Volunteer lightly touching the patients arm as a means of saying, “I’m here,” was one of the most beautiful and inspiring things I have ever seen.

Because of the Volunteer, our patient was able to visit with her sister at a time most precious and seek comfort in her passing through celebration.  A moment definitely made possible by hospice.

Idaho-Hospice-StoryBrittany McGlasson
Meridian Office Manager

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